EnergyTop Stories
GBO_SAF

Go Green with GBO: Experts applaud Europe’s SAF funding, but warn against environmental damage

Unlike traditional jet fuel derived from fossil fuels, SAF is made from renewable sources such as waste oils, algae, and crops

The European Union has recently passed a landmark climate law that aims to make the region carbon-neutral by 2050. As part of this ambitious plan, airlines are set to receive a significant funding boost to support the development and deployment of sustainable aviation fuel (SAF).

The new European Union climate law, passed in April 2021, aims to reduce the bloc’s greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels. The law also sets a target for the EU to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.

One of the critical measures in the new climate law is including the aviation sector in the EU’s emissions trading scheme (ETS). The ETS is a market-based system that allows companies to buy and sell emissions permits to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Under the new climate law, airlines will be required to buy emissions permits for all flights within the European Union. The revenues from the sale of these permits will be used to fund the development and deployment of sustainable aviation fuels.

SAFs are essential to the aviation sector’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike traditional jet fuel derived from fossil fuels, SAF is made from renewable sources such as waste oils, algae, and crops. As a result, SAF can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from aviation by up to 80% compared to traditional jet fuel.

The EU’s funding boost for SAF is a significant development that could have far-reaching implications for the aviation industry. While airlines have been exploring SAF use for some time, the high production cost and limited availability have been significant barriers to the fuel’s adoption.

However, with the European Union providing funding for SAF development and deployment, production will increase, and prices will decrease, making the solution more viable for airlines.

The aviation industry is one of the fastest-growing sources of greenhouse gas emissions, accounting for around 2.5% of global emissions. While airlines have taken steps to reduce their emissions, such as investing in more fuel-efficient aircraft, the industry still faces significant challenges in achieving its goal of carbon neutrality.

The EU’s funding boost for SAFs is a significant step forward in the aviation sector’s efforts to reduce its carbon footprint. By providing funding for the development and deployment of SAFs, the European Union is helping to create a market for these fuels, which will drive innovation and reduce costs.

Moreover, the EU’s climate law could have broader implications for the aviation industry. As airlines must buy emissions permits for all flights within the European Union, they will be incentivized to reduce their emissions further by investing in more fuel-efficient aircraft, improving operational efficiency, and exploring new technologies such as electric and hydrogen-powered planes.

While the EU’s funding boost is a step in the right direction, it will take time and investment to scale up SAF production and availability.

Furthermore, there are concerns that the use of biofuels could lead to environmental damage, such as deforestation and the displacement of food crops. Therefore, any new SAFs must be produced sustainably and environmentally friendly to avoid unintended consequences.

In conclusion, the EU’s funding boost for sustainable aviation fuels is a significant development that could have far-reaching implications for the aviation industry. By creating a market for these fuels, the EU is driving innovation and reducing costs, thus making it more feasible for airlines to adopt them and reduce their carbon footprint.

Moreover, including the aviation sector in the EU’s emissions trading scheme is a powerful incentive for airlines to reduce their emissions further by investing in more fuel-efficient aircraft and exploring new technologies.

However, it is crucial to ensure that the production of SAFs is sustainable and does not lead to unintended environmental consequences such as deforestation and the displacement of food crops.

As the aviation industry continues to evolve and seek more sustainable solutions, it is necessary to prioritize environmental responsibility to achieve a carbon-neutral future. The EU’s climate law provides a framework to achieve this, and with collective efforts and investments, a more sustainable aviation industry can be created.

Related posts

P2P lender Zopa receives UK banking licence

GBO Correspondent

DHL Global Forwarding launches new freight charter services for APAC, Europe and America

GBO Correspondent

Aramex signs deal with Transportr to boost Ittihad Group’s sea freight

GBO Correspondent